Trafalgar Studios

Trafalgar Studios 1

Capacity: 380

Currently playing: The Maids

Trafalgar Studios was formerly the Whitehall Theatre until 2004. It’s also known as Trafalgar Studios at the Whitehall Theatre in honour of its former incarnation and the building consists of two intimate theatres designed by architects Tim Foster and John Muir. Studio 1, the larger of the two spaces with 380 seats, opened on 3 June 2004 with the Royal Shakespeare Company’s production of Othello. The original Whitehall Theatre, built on the site of the 17th century Ye Old Ship Tavern was designed by Edward A. Stone, with interiors in the Art Deco style by Marc-Henri and Laverdet. It had 634 seats. The theatre opened on 29 September 1930 with The Way to Treat a Woman by Walter Hackett, who was the theatre’s licensee. During World War II it housed revues, which had become commonplace entertainment throughout the West End. In 1942, The Whitehall Follies, featuring Phyllis Dixey, the first stripper to perform in the theatre district, opened with great fanfare and became an immediate success. Dixey leased the theatre and remained in it for the next five years. In 1969 a nude revue called Pyjama Tops took over the venue and remained for five years, after which the building was shuttered until July 1982 when a production of “Private Dick” starring Robert Powell ran for 16 weeks. After considerable refurbishment that retained most of its Art Deco features, it reopened on 5 March 1986. Between 1997 and 1999, the theatre was converted into a television and radio studio used primarily to broadcast Jack Docherty’s popular talk show Live from London. Since 2004, Trafalgar Studios has presented short runs of revivals of classic plays and musicals.

Find out more about the West End production of The Maids, currently playing at London’s Trafalgar Studios 1

 

Trafalgar Studios 2

Capacity: 100

Studio 2, with 100 seats, opened in October 2005 with the play Cyprus.

The Trafalgar Studios, was formerly the Whitehall Theatre until 2004. It was also known as Trafalgar Studios at the Whitehall Theatre in honour of its former incarnation. The building consists of two intimate theatres designed by architects Tim Foster and John Muir. The original Whitehall Theatre, built on the site of the 17th century Ye Old Ship Tavern was designed by Edward A. Stone, with interiors in the Art Deco style by Marc-Henri and Laverdet. It had 634 seats. The theatre opened on 29 September 1930 with The Way to Treat a Woman by Walter Hackett, who was the theatre’s licensee. During World War II it housed revues, which had become commonplace entertainment throughout the West End. In 1942, The Whitehall Follies, featuring Phyllis Dixey, the first stripper to perform in the theatre district, opened with great fanfare and became an immediate success. Dixey leased the theatre and remained in it for the next five years. In 1969 a nude revue called Pyjama Tops took over the venue and remained for five years, after which the building was shuttered until July 1982 when a production of “Private Dick” starring Robert Powell ran for 16 weeks. After considerable refurbishment that retained most of its Art Deco features, it reopened on 5 March 1986. Between 1997 and 1999, the theatre was converted into a television and radio studio used primarily to broadcast Jack Docherty’s popular talk show Live from London. Since 2004, Trafalgar Studios has presented short runs of revivals of classic plays and musicals.